Ten-gauge galvanized steel is 0.1382 inch thick, and 10-gauge stainless steel is 0.1406 inch thick. The values differ because gauge is a measurement of weight, not thickness. The Manufacturers' Standard Gauge for Sheet Steel is based on an average weight of 41.82 pounds per square foot per inch thick. Someone unfamiliar with the gauge system may not understand what is meant by 18 gauge steel, for example. To help, this blog will explain the gauge system and features a sheet metal gauge chart. How are sheet metal gauges used? Gauges are used to specify the thickness of a sheet metal.

If you want to calculate various steel weight correctly, you must know the steel density first, such as steel density, iron density, aluminium density, brass density, etc, then to calculate the weight of ms plate, gi sheet, mild steel, stainless steel, ms angle, ms pipe etc in kg/m3 according to the weight calculation formula. Sheet Metal Gauge Size Chart Gauge (or gage) sizes are numbers that indicate the thickness of a piece of sheet metal, with a higher number referring to a thinner sheet. The equivalent thicknesses differ for each gauge size standard, which were developed based on the weight of the sheet for a given material.